Begin violin, viola or cello. A first look to the instrument.

italian language only

<< Today we have a study cello and I want you to see what give you the answers to the most frequent questions of a student, or of those who (for him) are interested in a stringed instrument for first time. Practically what customers usually asked me “What are the first things I have to do with my bowed instrument?” Because initially you buy it for studio, it will therefore be of a certain construction, inexpensive, that will have an equally economical quality control . As a result it needs some relatively simple maintenance setups, even quite economic. The first question is surely “But how do I play the violin or the cello?” It is not a superficial question, the strings with a non prepared bow do not sound because actually the bow runs on the string and does not grip it, let’s say it slips over it . So the first step is to take the rosin from the case, slightly nick it and rub it on the hair. Stretch the bow without exaggerating, the stick must be neither too straight nor too little, at this point begin to rub. Obviously it takes a few minutes, for the most inexperienced even a few good minutes! You need to make a quick movement because the heat spreads it faster. Next there will be a part 2 in which I explain what are the parts of the instrument that we should carry under maintenance the first time we buy a cello or a violin >>

To prepare the bow do not use rosin in the studio sets you buy, it is better to use a better pitch. The cost is negligible compared to the time you can use it. A package of it can last up to two years for a student. We recommend the following (Corelli Bernardel and Royal Oak rosin), you can also find them in more specialized physical stores.

Gibson comparing, guitar care is a must!

Even between two Gibson LP models of the same year (1992) the differences are well noted. The guitar care is important, let’s see why.

les paul Gibson
les paul guitars Gibson ’90 Studio

Setting up regularly is perhaps the most important variable, to have a performance guitar or bass that does not lose value over time

 

These two Gibsons have been changed the frets (the same dimensions for both) we reviewed the setups pretty much the same, but the playability of the instruments is still very different. The non-care of an instrument leads to make it less efficient at the fingerboard, neck and timbre.

Gibson truss rod,broken
Gibson truss rod,broken

A neck left untouched over time, can become very tenacious, but in the wrong position (upbow, backbow, or worst). Wood, by its nature, can bend in various points and can twist itself. The pickups can be demagnetized or broken. The metal parts (bridge and tuners) can oxidize to the point where they can no longer be used. And we could go on like this, listing other degenerative possibilities.